FAQs

What is emergency heat?

Also known as e-heat, aux, or auxiliary heat – are an assembly of electrically heated wire coils located inside of your unit. If you have a heat pump, as many in the southeast do, you might wonder what it means when and why your thermostat shows the emergency heat is running.

A heat pump works by pulling heat from the outside air and transferring it to your home for the heating cycle and reverses the process during the cooling season. This works great until temperatures drop below a certain point, usually around 35 degrees. All heat pumps by design can only maintain a 30 degree temperature differential from out side to inside. This means for instance that if the outdoor temp drops to 25 degrees then the best the heat pump alone may do is to maintain 55 degrees inside

Emergency heat is included as back up or supplemental heat, to the heat pump and allows the unit to reach the set temperature of the thermostat when it is more than 30 degrees higher than the temperature outside.

When do I use emergency heat?

Emergency heat should engage automatically and will run as a supplement to the heat pump until the outdoor temperature reaches a high enough degree that the heat pump can maintain on its own.

When should I replace my HVAC system or just seek AC Repair Chattanooga?

If your HVAC doesn’t work at all, that’s a good sign it’s time to call a professional. But what if you’re simply worried about your unit’s age, have needed a few minor repairs, or have some other reason to suspect it’s time to upgrade?

Our maintenance agreements are a great place to begin, with regular spring and fall checkups on the health of your heating and cooling system Our trained and certified technicians can let you know if it looks like your unit is reaching the end of its lifespan.

It’s easy to take your furnace, heat pump, or air conditioning unit for granted – after all, it’s always out there, working away. You might feel it’s out of sight, out of mind. But technology has made leaps and bounds in just the past decade. You may be surprised by what a big difference a new unit can make in terms of energy efficiency and keeping your pocketbook full.

Give us a Call and we can guide you through the possibilities if you think it may be time to upgrade your HVAC appliances.

How often should I replace my air filters?

Changing your air filters once a month is best. A good rule of thumb is remember to change your filters about the time you pay your power bill, this combined routine can be much easier to remember and tends to serve your HVAC system well.

Keeping your air filters changed and clean regularly can go a long way toward the lifespan, dependability and efficiency of your unit.

How long will my HVAC system last?

That depends on a variety of factors, such as what equipment you buy, your climate, and how well you maintain your system. Regular checkups, like the ones we offer with our maintenance agreement, are a great way to prolong the life of your unit. So does remembering to change your air filter regularly. But generally we expect your unit may last anywhere from ten to twenty years.

How do I know how much I should spend on a new air conditioner, furnace, or heat pump?

Good HVAC equipment is an investment – there’s no getting around that. How much you invest is partly up to you. A trustworthy HVAC expert will tell you what size unit you need, and will advise you on factors like gas vs. electric and even brand differences. They will also present you with a few different options at different price points.

The most energy efficient units are less expensive to operate and will pay for themselves over time. Paying a little more up front will save you money in the long run. If you aren’t planning on being in your home long-term, you might consider a more efficient system as a future selling point or elect to go with something slightly less efficient and costly to maximize your savings in the short term.

What do SEER and EER mean?

SEER = Seasonal Energy Efficiency Rating and EER = Energy Efficiency Rating. These abbreviations indicate the level of power consumption a system requires to operate . The federal government mandates minimum efficiency ratings for all HVAC equipment manufactured. currently this minimum is 14 SEER although it is not uncommon to see SEER ratings in conventional equipment routinely offered by most manufacturers at 20 SEER plus and touting nearing upwards of 30 SEER in the near future in the ductless market.

What do you mean by a unit TONNAGE?

A ton is the cooling capacity of an air conditioning system. One ton is equal to the amount of heat required (288,000 Btu) to melt one ton of ice in a 24-hour period. A one-ton air conditioner is rated at 12,000 Btu per hour.

How do I maintain my unit?

To keep your HVAC equipment in top shape, always routinely change the filters, pick a comfortable temperature setting and leave it, regularly rake or sweep leaves, mulch, and other debris from around your unit so it can fully exhaust air from within your home. Make sure any nearby bushes or trees aren’t growing into, obstructing or smothering the unit. Never build a deck or utility screen over or to close to the outdoor equipment. And participate in your available annual maintenance programs and coil cleanings.

Is it normal for my outside unit to frost over?

A heat pump will freeze/frost over if the outside air is cold enough to freeze any condensation to the unit. Your system will defrost itself periodically and you may see it frost over and defrost several times throughout the day. However, if your unit ever has heavy, thick ice build up or frost that is prolonged without receding this is an indication that there is some malfunction and you are in need of service.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Ever wondered how often you should replace your air filters or what it means when your thermostat says emergency heat? These questions answered and more helpful tips offered here.

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